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How A Septic System Works
Conventional septic tank
Riser lids for septic tank inspection and pumping
Tree roots growing in field lines causing septic system to fail
Tree roots in field lines causing septic system to fail
Water pooling in grass indicating field line failure
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, How A Septic System Works
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Conventional septic tank
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Riser lids for septic tank inspection and pumping
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Tree roots growing in field lines causing septic system to fail
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Tree roots in field lines causing septic system to fail
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Water pooling in grass indicating field line failure

How A Septic System Works

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Dodd Construction is licensed and certified by the State of Alabama to install and repair basic and advanced septic systems, including sewer pumps.

Maintaining Your Septic System
All drains, pipes and traps that carry waste water out of your home require maintenance.  Septic system maintenance involves periodic pumping and filter cleaning.  Solid waste that accumulates in the tank must be pumped out in order to prevent it from spilling over into your drain field, which will cause your system to fail.  If your system fails, you may have to replace it.
  •  Learn the location of your tank and field lines
  •  Do not flush anything solid but toilet paper!
  •  Do not flush feminine products.
  •  Don't park vehicles over your tank or field lines
  •  Pump your septic tank every 3 - 5 years
  •  Keep your septic tank lid and clean-outs easily accesible
  •  Do not plant anything but grass over your tank and lines
  •  Additives and cleaners are not necessary
  •  Do not put grease into your sink drains
  •  Divert rain water runoff from your septic drain field
  •  Do not build anything over your tank or field lines

How Does My Septic System Work?

Drain pipes from your house carry wastewater, by gravity, to your septic tank. The solids settle to the bottom of the tank, while the water rises until it spills over the baffle into the secondary chamber. Fats, oils, and grease will float to the top, creating a scum layer. If any solids migrate to the secondary chamber of the septic tank, they are retained by a filter. (This filter needs occasional removing and rinsing to prevent it from clogging, preventing the wastewater from exiting the tank.) The wastewater is distributed to the field lines, where it is absorbed by the soil through perforated pipes.

The scum layer and solids will need to be pumped out routinely, in order to prevent solid waste buildup from entering your field lines and clogging them up. There are signs that point you to know when your tank is past due for being pumped out. Some septic systems are equipped with an audible alarm that will sound if your system needs attention. If your home's drain pipes are clear of debris, but water begins to gurgle or back up into your sinks and tubs, your tank may be full. If you notice foul odors coming from your household drains, wastewater may be backing up from your overly full septic tank. If you notice water pooling on top of the tank or field lines, your field lines may be clogged with tree roots or solids from your tank. Incredibly lush and green grass growth over your tank and field lines may indicate that your grass plants are taking up very nutrient-rich wastewater.

If your home has an older septic system that does not have risers at ground level, we can install risers that prevent the soil over your tank from being excavated every time you need to maintenance your system.